Clovers REVIEW

Reduce bias and increase focus

Review resumes more fairly by removing the bias in resumes in the selection process and objectively scoring based on predetermined skills needed for the job.

7.4 seconds
Recruiters spend 7.4 seconds reviewing a candidate before passing.
48%
48% of HR managers admitted that bias affects their candidate choice.
19%
Workers aged 49 to 51 receive 19% fewer responses than aged 29 to 31.

Want more hiring insights? Download the State of Hiring 2022 Report

Automatically redact info that triggers unconscious bias

Halo Effect

Assuming something positive about a person because they’re associated with a brand, person, or place you enjoy. “If they worked for Apple, they must be a strong candidate.”

Confirmation Bias

Looking for information to reinforce your pre-existing beliefs. “Gen Z doesn’t work hard, so she’ll be a poor performer.”

Affinity Bias

Preferring people who have things in common with you. “We’re both from the Northeast, so I want him on my team.”

Groupthink

Making decisions to reach consensus instead of thinking critically. “My manager likes them, so they must be a strong choice.”

Stereotype Bias

Attributing characteristics to someone because they belong to a certain group—like a generation, race, or socioeconomic status. “He’s too old to keep up with our tech.”

 

Add structure to your shortlist by assessing with predetermined standards

Give each applicant a fair shot with Clovers’ resume review tools. First, reduce the influence of bias by redacting personal details. Then, score applicants based on pre-weighted qualifications. Not only is this better for applicants, it’s better for you—data-based decisions fill your shortlist with the strongest candidates possible.

“A blind, systematic process helps improve the chances of including the most competent candidates in your interview pool by anonymizing applications, thereby uncovering some hidden gems and sourcing diverse candidates.”

Based on science, not bias.

Clovers inclusion guidance is created by sophisticated algorithms powered by scientific research.

Research is accurate

Thousands of subjects are asked in surveys if certain terms cause them not to feel comfortable applying. Inclusive terms are also identified where candidates have greater comfort in applying. Because we stick to data validated by research, we know the impact our words have on people. Request our research

Don’t rely just on AI

Artificial intelligence is subject to the bias of the humans who created it. So don’t use crowdsourcing or guesswork to build your processes, and stop scanning the web looking for trends on your own—you could be feeding your algorithms faulty data. Instead, use high quality research to build your hiring systems.

Don’t get distracted by demographics—evaluate skills and experience.

https://clovers.ai/wp-content/uploads/2023/01/job-dash.png https://clovers.ai/wp-content/uploads/2023/01/weighted-attributes.png https://clovers.ai/wp-content/uploads/2023/01/compare-skills.png https://clovers.ai/wp-content/uploads/2023/01/structured-interviews.png

Job dashboard

Get a bird’s eye view of each candidate’s file for easy screening. Quickly review resume scores or their progression through your interview process.

Weighted attributes

Drag and drop resumes to add candidate details to job requisitions seamlessly. Easily see how each applicant measures up to your pre-established requirements.

Compare skills

Compare key skills and applicant information effortlessly. Identify top candidates and highlight potential hires.

Structure interviews

Structure interviews for consistency. Ask compliant questions that accurately evaluate candidates.

https://clovers.ai/wp-content/uploads/2023/01/job-dash.png

Job dashboard

Get a bird’s eye view of each candidate’s file for easy screening. Quickly review resume scores or their progression through your interview process.

https://clovers.ai/wp-content/uploads/2023/01/weighted-attributes.png

Weighted attributes

Drag and drop resumes to add candidate details to job requisitions seamlessly. Easily see how each applicant measures up to your pre-established requirements.

https://clovers.ai/wp-content/uploads/2023/01/compare-skills.png

Compare skills

Compare key skills and applicant information effortlessly. Identify top candidates and highlight potential hires.

https://clovers.ai/wp-content/uploads/2023/01/structured-interviews.png

Structure interviews

Structure interviews for consistency. Ask compliant questions that accurately evaluate candidates.

Got 15 minutes? See how Clovers helps you hire better.
See it in action

Questions to ask yourself when reducing bias in your hiring process

Have you crafted an inclusive job description?

Job descriptions optimized for inclusive language helps your brand appeal to a broad range of people.

Learn more

Do you ensure anonymous candidate resume review?

Review resumes fairly by redacting information that triggers bias.

Learn more

Do you understand the skills needed for the role?

Clearly understanding the skills needed for the role will give you a roadmap to assess candidates.

Learn more

Do you utilize objective hiring assessments?

Train your interviewers to assess with clear guidelines and the same structured questioning for every role.

Learn more

Have you instituted a diverse screening panel?

Establish a panel of diverse people to review candidates to minimize the unconscious bias of a few.

Learn more

Do you reinforce awareness of bias in your team’s hiring decisions?

Train your interviewers to use objective, fact-based hiring techniques.

Learn more

Thoughtfully designed for scale

Array

Prioritize diversity and inclusion

Array

Write directly in your ATS

Array

Any time, any device

Array

Integrations for seamless workflows

Array

Backed by research-based science

Array

Privacy and security certified

Array

Team analytics and reporting

Array

Access a rich partner ecosystem

Array

Your compliance is our priority

Array

Dedicated customer success team

Frequently asked questions

  • A landmark study by Yale University psychologists unraveled the subtleties of job discrimination that result from stereotyping. The study showed that even when we think we’re reviewing a candidate for totally objective screening criteria, like education or experience, a gut-level idea about who would traditionally fill a job often actually influences influenced who we select.

    In the experiment, participants reviewed resumes that presented a male and female candidate for police chief. The resumes were actually identical with two alternating variables: whether the resume belonged to Michael or Michelle and whether the candidate had more formal education or more experience. Michael’s ratings consistently came out on top. When he was the resume without a college education, but with more experience, participants said they picked him for “having more street smarts.” They still picked Michael when Michelle had more experience and Michael had gone to college, saying that Michelle wasn’t a good candidate due to lack of education.

    The good news is that the study also showed how to mitigate our predisposition for prejudice. Asking reviewers to establish screening criteria importance beforehand eliminated this shifting merits effect. With Clovers, resume reviewers are asked to “pre-commit” to which qualities are most important for job performance, helping eliminate the possibility that you will be swayed by other content in a particular candidate’s resume, such as their race, gender, or where they went to school.

  • Howard versus Heidi, Greg versus Jamal—researchers have replicated countless times that the inferred race or gender (or parenthood or religious status) of an applicant affects how we rate their qualifications; this is especially true when it comes to resume screening. When study participants were shown completely identical resumes save one fact—one has the name Heidi, and one has Howard—Howard gets higher ratings. We see the same effect when comparing a white-sounding name with a black-sounding name: Greg gets more callbacks than Jamal. By scoring a resume before getting identity information, Clovers helps users ensure an added measure of objectivity.

  • If you watched season three of Mozart and the Jungle you’ll recall New York Symphony candidates auditioning behind a white screen for the open oboe chair. In the 1970s, U.S. orchestras were only 5% female. As orchestras became aware of the concept of gender bias in their auditions, most started using a screen for auditions by the end of the 1980s. Today they are well above 30%, and researchers credit “the screen” with up to 55% of the increase in female new hires.

    A similar rationale is at play in a popular reality TV show The Voice. Judges have to vote for candidates with their backs turned to them, judging candidates purely on their vocal talent—a self-proclaimed rejection of the superficiality that too often defines a singer’s success.

    And when it comes to resume screenings, when researchers manipulate “perceived race” by changing resumes from white-sounding names like “Emily” and “Greg” to non-white sounding names like “Lakisha” and “Jamal”, white names are called back 50% more than non-white ones.

Ready make meaningful change?

Reach out to a Clovers expert for a demo on how we can help
your diversity hiring efforts.